Orchard Singapore Teens

In Orchard all kids experience troubled times, some more serious than others. As mentoring is essential for children to grow and become mature adults, the question that may creep in your head is how to be a good mentor? There are some common traits found in a good mentor in Orchard Singapore.

A good mentor has faith in the child. He gives the child time to develop trust in them, and values their trust. He shows that he genuinely believes in the child, and that the child has the power to change and be who they want to be. He builds up trust with his mentee. It can sometimes take months for a child to open up in front of a stranger. A good mentor in Orchard shows that he enjoys spending time with the child, and tells them he’d like to help however he can. He starts by making sure that the child is at least on friendly terms with him, and talks to them about their mentoring experiences. He respects and practices confidentiality. He tells the child that everything is between the two of them, and that everything is confidential. He doesn’t disclose the child’s feelings, thoughts, or emotions to other people. He allows the child to handle conflicts on their own unless they ask for help.

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A good mentor is an active listener. Always smiling and positive, he treats the child as an individual. A good mentor listens with respect and understanding, and waits until the child has finished speaking. He shows an interest in whatever the child says by responding and asking open questions to get them to talk more. He lets the child talk for as long as they like. This helps the child in beginning to trust the mentor. A good mentor is genuine and doesn’t act like someone he’s not. He helps the child in critical-thinking and problem-solving. He shows that he genuinely enjoys spending time with the child, and affirms their feelings. He makes them believe that they are strong and will be able to get through it.

Most children have carefree, uneventful childhoods. They do not experience life changing events. Unfortunately though, there are those children who have had negative emotional experiences that can leave them emotionally scarred for life. These are the children who receive help from child psychologists.

Child psychologists have got the training and ability to deal and uncover problems that children may be hiding. They are also trained to deal with emotional and behavioral aspects of the negative experiences the child has had. They are trained to gain the trust of the children, so they can unravel any secrets they children might be hiding. For this, you have to be innovative, while keeping it realistic. For example some children might respond well to the use of puppets to help them open up to the therapist. When the children open up and reveal their inner thoughts, it is easy for the psychologist to understand the issues, the roots of the problems and from thereon recommend modes of therapy. They are also in a better position to advice the parents on their children problems and advice them on how to handle the situation.

To be a successful child psychologist, you will have to be patient, caring, innovative, and definitely have a love for children. It is advisable to train under a seasoned professional, to enable them to pick up practical methods, as what is learn in class isn't always enough.

They also need to be able to perform research and document the scientific evidence collected, as well as find correlations between behavior and different factors. The research conducted also provided us with information on cognitive and mental abilities.

He tries to discuss the positive sides of tough situations without belittling the child’s emotions. He shares stories of his own experiences of how he got through tough situations to help the child understand they are not alone. He asks the child questions to get to know them better. He takes note of things the child is interested in. Active listening is a huge part of treating the child as an individual. He talks to them positively and commend them for sharing something that was difficult to say.

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A good mentor encourages the child, provides them with resources, and celebrates their achievements. He focuses on the child’s goals, not their problems. He helps the child focus on their education, health and on their positive relationships. He finds ways to gradually get away from the child’s risky behavior. At ShutlerFitness when the child discusses one of their goals, whether small or big, a good mentor is supportive and helps them to focus on working toward their goal. He knows that children need to have goals in order to avoid risky behaviour. He uses short-term goals as a way to work towards their long-term goals, and shares ideas they may not have thought of on their own. If the child needs help finding other supportive services, he helps the child access resources they need. When the child reaches one of their goals, he tells them he is proud of them. He gives the child emotional motivation to keep going and helps them try to reach more goals. He holds them accountable for their actions so the child learns to take responsibility for themselves. He supports them throughout the process.

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A good mentor commits his time regularly for a long period. He arranges some schedule of appointments and keeps to it in Orchard. Mentor relations are most beneficial when they last for a long time. When he has a meeting with the child, he tries not to skip it under any circumstances. He becomes the person that the child can count on to follow through. A good mentor sets some realistic expectations. He talks to the child about their goals, and lets the child know that he believes they can do well. He makes it clear he expects the child to try to reach their goals, and helps them to succeed. He discusses with the child concrete ways they can do this. He asks open-ended questions, and why the child wants to achieve their goals and how they plan on doing it. He talks to the child about ways to manage their time. He shares mistakes he’s made and how he learned from them. Sharing his own experiences, he tells the child why he thinks they should or shouldn’t do something. He builds a solid relationship so that the child places trust in him. He communicates with the child on a regular basis so they can become more comfortable with him.


So much of how we see the world as adults is developed when we’re children—what we eat dictates what we like to eat as adults, what we hear molds into the languages we speak, the community in which we grow takes on a new name with new meaning: home. As we get older, travel can serve as a break from the comforts of home; experiences that are often so formative they become ingrained in our memory for decades to come. What happens, then, when you’re raised in a shifting environment in which travel is home? When “home,” as we know it, is but one of many, always temporary, stops on a rootless journey around the world?



Once limited to a tiny sliver of the global population—the children of missionaries, diplomats, and members of the military (the so-called “army brats”)—the subsection has expanded as global commerce has become the norm, to include kids brought up in countries that aren’t their own by multinational businesspeople, foreign correspondents, international school teachers, and more.
Ruth Van Reken, co-author of Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds, sees the organic development of a TCK subculture as part of an innate desire to build likeminded community. “Every human being has a need to belong. We have to have some place that we know and are known,” she tells me in a conversation bridging the gap between interview and therapy session. Relating to others who have lived an uprooted and mobile life helps put things in perspective: It’s a crucial reminder that others have had the same privilege, but that they too face many of the same challenges.


 Additionally, thrown out of one environment into a markedly different one, there never really is time to fully say goodbye to a world you’ve only just come to know. “When a child is leaving a place they really love and they’re not given the time to process it, it can feel like your whole world died.”

In Orchard a good mentor really thinks about why he wants to be a mentor. He really needs to be clear for himself on whether he has the time, patience, commitment and maturity required. He must honestly evaluate himself on whether there is a good enough reason or not. He gets his own training and support. Having his own support team and sources of information is very important for being a good mentor. He should regularly talks to other mentors who have experience in dealing with children personal issues. As a mentor its he must document and follow a mentoring plan. He should identify the purpose of his mentoring relationship and the course of mentoring he’d like to put in place. Shutlerfitness allows for brainstorms potential activities and discussions.

Finally, he should stay committed to his mentoring relationship with the child.