Clarke Quay Obesity In Kids

The role of a child mentor  in Clarke Quay is to encourage the personal and professional development of a mentee through the sharing of knowledge, expertise, and experience. Mentoring provides one of the most effective and valuable development opportunities for a child. Mentoring programs incorporate a focus on positive development, youth-driven activities, and the development of core competencies and skills. Mentoring programs must operate on the foundation that relationships are at the core of youth mentoring and are the catalyst for youth change and development. The relationship is the mechanism by which change happens in mentoring. Benefits of mentoring in Clarke Quay Singapore are widespread, and the benefits of mentoring relationship go both ways. Developing a mentoring relationship can be life-changing.

The child develops trust in life in the form of a mentor who is accessible and available to support the child in his development and mental health. The child having a mentor shows improvement in communication and personal skills. A mentor improves interpersonal skills of the child and teaches how to maintain a professional relationship and foster a long-lasting relationship.

For Third Culture Kids Travelling is Everything

Children often doubt themselves and often feel like they don’t belong. It helps to have someone who believes in them. Mentoring increases the child’s self-esteem. Healthy relationships, and the sense of safety, trust, belonging, and security they foster, form the foundation of child’s capacity to develop self-esteem in Clarke Quay SGP. Mentoring also increases self-confidence in the ability of the child to execute the task at hand. The child begins to see himself as more self-aware.

A lot of learning happens outside the school and mentoring is a critical part of it. Mentoring provides access to a support system during critical stages of child development. Mentors give the youth a voice and choice. A mentor guides the child, gives them valuable information, and let them make their own choices. Mentoring helps youth develop life skills such as critical-thinking, problem-solving, and goal-setting.

Ucla Child Psychiatry

Many children lack the knowledge and skills to navigate the challenges of adult life. A mentor helps set future goals for the child. The child is being helped to identify and achieve career goals, and this provides clear understanding and enhancement of academic and career development plans. The child receives a greater knowledge of career success factors. Stronger sense of professional identity leads to better performance at school in Clarke Quay . This makes the child more likely to complete high school, take better control of his or her career, and gain employment.

A mentored child gains exposure to new ideas and ways of thinking. Having someone to get non-judgemental advice from, advice on complicated matters that friends and family would not know how to solve, gives new perspectives that the child wouldn’t have thought of on her own.

Mentors provide encouragement and motivation for the child. Specially trained mentors have the ability to change a youth’s outlook from one of despair to one of optimism and opportunity. The child gets advice on developing strengths and overcoming weaknesses. The mentor often talks to child about problems that crop up in child’s life, provides a way of seeing through difficulties, and assisting them in problem-solving. The child develops a skill or competency and gets the means and resources to establish a life of independence in Clarke Quay .

Mind of ‘Third Culture’ Kids - Insight

Admit it; we all are fond of children. Children are the most precious creatures in the world. Their smile, laughter, noises, and babbling adds to the beauty of the universe. On the contrary, the sadness and sickness of the children snatch the sleep from the parents’ eyes.

It is the reason that the young children require special attention and care from everyone around.

Every child deserves kindness, care, love, and attention, but the children with special needs and certain disabilities require extra love and attention. These children are either unable to perform their tasks themselves or face some difficulties in their lives and works.

The special children, the mentally, physically or emotionally deranged individuals, need extraordinary help to lead a better and normal life as compared to the children with normal and stable faculties.

Consider a visually impaired child walking on the road; a physically handicapped child climbing the staircase or a mentally retarded child joining the school.

What kind of emotions or feelings arise in our hearts seeing these young innocent individuals of the society? Besides developing the feelings of pity and sympathy, have we ever thought of doing something worth-noting for these children with special needs?

Yes, these apparently disabled children with bright minds and promising personalities deserve more love, respect, and attention. They don't only need our full-time attention, but our full support as well in all walks of their lives.

What needs to be done for these children for promoting their rights is the serious question we must ask ourselves. With the few simple steps and actions discussed below, we can ensure a worth-living future for the entangled minds and the hearts of our nation, society, and country:

  1. Love with all the heart.

    What better way to promise the safety and security of the special children than to shower immense kindness, care, and dedication toward them.
    For this purpose, special programs and shows can be arranged for these children to pay rich tributes to them on the basis of their skills and competence. Instead of shunning them or their presence in the world, keep them involved in the daily chores and activities in the life
     

  2. Acknowledge the presence.

    Many of us consider the special children a burden on society and spend our whole lives staying away from them. It is a highly unhealthy attitude and should be reprimanded at all levels.
    To promote the rights of children with special needs, acknowledge them. Praise their existence in the world and help them to fulfill their aims and desires. It is the first and foremost responsibility of every person to accept them wholeheartedly.
     

  3. Launch awareness campaigns

    There is no denying the fact that we, particularly the parents, are in the habit of hiding their special children because they think that society will disprove their presence.
    It is due to the fact that the world in general and the individuals, in particular, do not know the importance of these younger beings. Yes, like it or not; they are more talented and bright than normal children.
    We all have seen exceptionally talented blind poets, handicapped painters, and physically disabled sculptors and pianists. It is our duty to not only recognize their talents but also launch worldwide campaigns and seminars to promote the habit of accepting these children.
     

  4. Stand in support

    Last but not the least; we all should join our hands together to support these special children in all their activities, educational domains, careers and goals in life.
    Instead of leaving these young individuals alone in the battle of life, fight with them wholeheartedly to show support, dedication, and devotion towards these children with special needs. Standing with them and supporting them will give them courage and strength to deal with their disabilities and imperfections in a positive way. 

Our children, our future, our asset, and our strength, need the utmost kindness, love, and care; but the children with special needs deserve our praise, acknowledgment, support and respect. Love them, acknowledge them, stand with them and support them to make them the better-adapted individuals in the society. Start caring for these children today and see a difference in the world tomorrow.

Mentoring for vulnerable teenagers and young people has a profound impact on the trajectory of their lives. The often dysfunctional coping mechanism a child employs to manage trauma, loss, and fear, contributes to a cycle of at-risk behaviour. Interrupting that cycle is critical. A caring adult in child’s life can help foster resilience, and can provide a corrective experience for past negative relationships. Mentoring relationships can provide a buffer for youth against serious struggles and build their resilience and capacity to manage difficulties.

Third Culture Kid Identity Crisis

Mentoring provides improved quality of life and fewer dissociation symptoms. Mentored youth are more likely to report positive overall health and less likely to have suicidal thoughts. A mentored child improves self-awareness and is less likely to begin using alcohol and illegal drugs. Mentors provide emotional support and act as role models to youth. Mentors aid the child in teaching them about healthy relationships, including kids conflict resolution and anger-management. The child develops leadership and management qualities.

Importance of Good Parenting in Child Development

A mentoring relationship helps the mentors as well. It strengthens the mentor’s active listening skills. It increases mentor’s sense of self-worth, and establishes a sense of fulfilment through teaching. It provides added sense of purpose and responsibility to the mentor, who in turn can develop leadership and management skills in children. It provides a way to give back to community and help other people grow and learn.

Helping Teens With Depression

Young people who succeed academically and in their personal lives are socially and emotionally competent. They are self-aware and have a positive attitude toward themselves and others. They know their strengths and are optimistic about their future. They can handle their emotions. They are able to set and achieve goals. And they are effective, responsible problem-solvers. This is how a society progresses and this is in a great way supported by children mentoring.

Raising children is not easy no matter what era. But more often than not, parents and their offspring debate on who had it easier when it comes to raising children. Baby Boomers talk about their old-school ways and convey a mixture of bragging with complaining about the smart home devices that today’s parents have at their disposal to help monitor and take care of their children. “Back in the day, we didn’t have those”, they say. But Millennials have a logical argument to counter: “back in the day” they had more help from their own parents, who – different from today - were, at large, retired already.

It’s that Agequake and the population pyramid problem we have already talked about. With the medical advances, humanity has achieved, we are living with quality longer, which makes us leave the workforce later, which, in turn, makes younger parents not able to resort to their parents for help with raising children. That might also be a contributing factor to the birth rate decrease over the last decades. It was so common to have 3 to 6 kids, and nowadays – due to the fast-paced life and impossible living costs - that idea is viewed as very unusual or almost frowned-upon. The general middle class can’t even picture it; it’s typically something that only the most financially privileged or the least educated really consider.

So the first undeniable premise is this: times have changed.

Private Schools, Charter Schools, Homeschooling… when it comes to the formal education of their kids, parents these days have all these alternatives to Public Schools which can be seen as a good thing older parents didn’t have. If their “values” weren’t represented in the schools available, they would have to work harder to make sure their kids would follow its preferred principles and would enforce that either in-person at home, or at churches etc.

But what about the number of hours and commitment students are required nowadays? It’s unprecedented. Back in the day, kids had much more free time to run around and play outside until the street lights came on. Parents didn’t have to worry so much about their safety because of several reasons: the streets were less crowded, which in turn made for fewer car accidents, child kidnapping, and other hazards. It was easier for one neighbor to keep an eye on everyone, freeing parents to do their own thing. Nowadays, parenting is a non-stop activity that will cost money if you want your kid’s development to have some independence from you – and, as we all know, money is something Millennials don’t have a lot of. Not only the costs of many after-school activities but the time it takes for one to pick their kids up from school and drive them to the places where these activities happen can be brutal.

And what about the psychological aspects of parenting today compared with some time ago? While social media is yet another thing for people to worry about when it comes to raising their children, this culture of fear is nothing new and one could argue that it was much worse back then. The Cold War presented a never-ending prospect of imminent annihilation by way of nuclear explosions. Kids went through nuclear explosions drills at school. But well, we guess this one was replaced by the dangers of school shootings – a reality that, sadly, happens much more often than yesterday’s nuclear threat.

 

Special Needs Parenting

With all of that, there are some things where it’s undeniable where one might have had it harder than the other. Special Needs Children, for instance. Just so you understand the drama: “back in the day” there wasn’t even this denomination for the condition. Baby Boomers parents were trailblazers when it comes to special needs parenting and we owe them all the advancements hard-won by their struggle, whether active or inert, through love or pain, by trial and error.

It’s not fair to say that current parents “have it easy”, though. Children on the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) need safer homes still, there are a lot of things we as a society need to do better when it comes to dealing with special needs children and adults. But, yes, a parent bringing a special needs children to the world right now has many more resources, support and an overall understanding of what awaits them. Special needs parenting is never easy, but it was much harder than it is today and we hope 10 years from now, special needs parenting gets even less hard.

What is good parenting?

All of those questions of who had it harder when it comes to raising children poses the question of what is good parenting in the first place.

Independent from the time in which the act of parenting is inserted, good parenting is allowing your child his/her individuality making sure he/she doesn’t fall on too traumatic traps and unredeemable precipices. Good parenting is being present without suffocating. It’s providing all the tools the child needs to develop their best self while on his/her own. So it’s a difficult measure, really. You can’t be too controlling, otherwise the kid will grow up to be a repressed adult, but you can’t be too liberal, otherwise, your kid will grow up with no boundaries and respect for others. You can’t be too giving, otherwise the kid will grow up to be an adult who waits for things to fall on their lap, and you can’t just throw your kids out there with no support, otherwise they will grow up to be not only psychologically damaged but way behind anyone else in the “race for success”.

And that takes a lot of time and effort and can be an enormous burden. That’s why the joys of parenting are so big; otherwise, no one would go through it. Through hits and misses, it’s important for parents to have empathy and support. From family, from friends, and even strangers. Western society can be cruel regarding empathy. How many times have strangers reprimanded parents regarding their children's behavior in a rude way? Even if they think they’re not intruding with a simple “Why don’t you try X?”, when a baby is crying, for instance. Strangers don’t have the big picture of what’s behind that cry. Is it a new tooth? A fever? Or maybe it’s nothing - babies cry; it’s how they express themselves! And the parents might not have had anyone to drop the kid off with (or didn’t have the confidence to do so), and it’s their anniversary or the only time they could manage to have some time together, and there you are annoyed because the baby is taking a little longer than you’d like to get quiet. It can be disturbing at times but we have to do better when it comes to those interactions and find a nice way to intervene – if we really can’t hold it in to ourselves and let it slide; in 30 minutes (or even less) the kid will be an annoying memory, while the parent will still have to deal with the kid and the difficulties of raising children.

If you have passed through that and you think it wasn’t that difficult: good for you; you are blessed! Check your privileges and feel empathy for the ones who have difficulties with it. How do you feel when someone diminishes the difficulty you have with the things you are not good at?

In conclusion, just like there is no formula to answer what is good parenting, there is no answer to who had it easier raising children. As much empathy as we can feel for others, no drama is as dramatic as our own because only we feel it in our skin. And that’s the beauty of empathy, actually. Humans are the only animals who can feel it and decide to act (or not) on it, in a way that even feeling so much for ourselves, we have the nobility of being understanding of others’ struggles to the point that we, sometimes, even put their needs in front of ours. Which is, come to think about, is, in fact, a piece of sound advice for people wanting to understand what is good parenting: raising children right it’s all about putting your kids need in front of your own.